Stock Up on These Prepper Medical Supplies NOW

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by Chris Hayes

When prepping, it’s crucial to remember to stock up on prepper medical supplies. Often people think about stocking up on food, firearms, and ammo. But what about health care, first aid, or trauma care? If you had to take care of an injury or illness at home, could you do it? 

Regardless of one’s personal thoughts and feelings on COVID-19 and vaccines, the strain of a pandemic can produce unexpected responses. In Cat Ellis’ book, Prepping for a Pandemic, she examined those responses during the 2014 Ebola pandemic, and her warnings for us are proving true. In her book, Ms. Ellis lays out how people die during a pandemic – not from the pandemic disease itself – but lack of healthcare of all kinds.

Why You Need to be Medically Prepared

Three risk factors may jeopardize your access to healthcare soon.

  1. A shortage of healthcare workers in the US
  2. The likelihood of continued supply chain disruptions
  3. Medical providers denying service due to COVID-19 vaccination status

US Shortage of Healthcare Workers

As Aden Tate reports here, we are facing a shortage of healthcare workers in the US. Hospitals and healthcare facilities have been short-staffed for years. But, the exhaustion of providing care during COVID-19 while understaffed has only exacerbated the problem.

As we enter another cold, flu & covid season, we can expect the demands on our healthcare system and workers to intensify. Appointments will become more challenging to make, and wait times for urgent care will be longer.

Supply Chain Disruptions

Add to this that we still import most of our medical supplies from China. In May, China’s Yantian port shut down for an entire month due to a COVID-19 outbreak. Last week, China just shut down Ningbo-Zhoushan port when a single worker tested positive for COVID-19. Ningbo-Zhoushan is the world’s third busiest container port and the second largest in China. Chinese port closings could easily cause a global shortage in medical supplies.

Denial of Service

In the book mentioned above, Prepping for a Pandemic, author Cat Ellis describes how a pregnant woman died because a doctor would not see her during the Ebola pandemic. She did not have any symptoms of Ebola, but the fear was too great. During her at-home labor, the woman experienced complications, and both she and her baby died.

While COVID-19 does not remotely come close to the lethality of Ebola, some doctors are still refusing service. Not out of fear of catching the disease, but because they don’t want to treat unvaccinated people. This Alabama doctor is refusing to treat unvaccinated patients because he “doesn’t want to see them die.” That Alabama doc isn’t the only one. This New York physician wants to restrict non-vaccinated patients to telehealth only. Hopefully, their patients can all afford reliable internet.

This mindset doesn’t seem to match the Hippocratic oath to treat all. But, as Daisy Luther points out, the discrimination and dehumanization of non-vaccinated people are only going to get worse.

Prepper Medical Supplies to Get NOW

With fewer healthcare workers available to treat patients, plus the likelihood of additional port closures, now is the time to do two things:

  1. Stock up on medical/trauma care supplies.
  2. Learn how to use them.

Below is my list of OTC medicines and medical supplies I keep on hand for my family, broken down by category. I have included brand names next to the generic name or active ingredient for name recognition when appropriate.

Don’t panic when you see the list. You don’t have to buy absolutely everything at once, and you may already have many of these items on hand. But all of us at The OP strongly recommend doing an inventory of your home medical supplies and plugging holes as soon as possible.

I have included multiple options in some cases because different medications may be more appropriate for different situations. For example, there are several options for general pain relief. However, some people are allergic to ibuprofen and other NSAIDs. Others may not be able to take aspirin due to blood-thinning medication. Know your health and use your best judgment.

Be sure to read the product labels of each item to make sure these specific items are safe and appropriate for you and your family. Some medications have cautions for children or individuals with specific health conditions. Make substitutions to suit your individual needs.

Pain Relief

Wound Care: Bandages

Note: Within the wound care category, there are several subcategories. All are important.

Wound Care: Wound Closures

Wound Care: Wound Wash

Digestive Relief

Allergy Relief

Respiratory Relief

Skin Relief

Women’s Health

UTIs

Other Tools

Other Miscellaneous Prepper Medical Supplies

It’s Crucial to Know How to Use Your Prepper Medical Supplies

All of this stuff is useless if you do not know how to use them. Here are some reference manuals to get you started. These will show you what to do in most common, and some not so common situations when medical and dental care are either restricted or unavailable.

Plan for Your Unique Needs

Every household will have different medical needs depending on factors like age, gender, and overall health. If you need to refill prescriptions, stock up on diabetic supplies, or add diaper rash ointment if you have infants. If you have children, make sure you know the proper dosages of kid-safe medicine.

With some basic medical supplies on hand, you can avoid long lines at your doctor, walk-in clinic, or emergency room during a pandemic. You may also find those supplies necessary in case of supply or service shortages. I hope you never need them. But, I hope even more that you’ll have them if you do.

Are You Stocked Up On Prepper Medical Supplies?

Do you have any prepper medical supplies you would add to the list? Tell us what those things are and why you believe it’s important to have them. Let’s discuss it in the comments.

About Chris

Chris Hayes is a lifelong prepper and survivalist from rural Maine. Due to extreme weather, preparedness is built into the lifestyle of many Mainers. The Hayes family are no exception. They live off-grid, enjoy hunting and fishing, bushcraft, beekeeping, and making their own herbal medicines. When not tending to the homestead, Chris spends time practicing martial arts.

Stock Up on These Prepper Medical Supplies NOW
Chris Hayes

Chris Hayes

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  • What about pets? Does can take aspirin but cats can’t. But aspirin is hard on their stomach. Charcoal is important should your per eat some poisonous. Wraps, splints for broken bones. Some type of book on how to treats animals. There are numerous OTCs to treat pets and help with chronic conditions.

    • @Judy Petsch ABSOLUTELY NOT!!!!! Cats are very VERY different than any other animal when it comes to NSAIDS!! 1 single Tylenol will kill a cat. Their livers do NOT metabolize these things like other animals. Their doses are so very minute and ONLY certain NSAIDS can be given. I’m a RVT for over 25 years more than 10 yrs in ER/ICU/CCU. the very MOST a full adult cat can get is 1/4 of a tablet of a baby Aspirin every 3 days (72 hours) and should ONLY be given for short periods of times for course of treatments. Dogs should get a BUFFERED aspirin like Bufferin or Ascriptin. These drugs should ONLY be given when no other options are available. The best thing you can and should do is call your vet or at your next appointment TALK to your vet. Explain what you are doing. That you are putting together a disaster kit for your pet and would like to include some pain/anti-inflammatory medications for your pet. You should also include digestive meds as the most common issue in animals is vomiting and/or diarrhea. NO PEPTO! keopectate is better. I love that you mention Charcoal. they DO sell bottles of activated charcoal and I suggest everyone should add this to their med kits for humans and animals! I caution the use of herbals. They ARE good but their systems are very different than humans. They are completely different species so they will react differently to the same herbs. Some herbs will require a slightly higher concentration. MOST require LESS of a concentration. Definately do your homework and use reputable resources. NOT from a he said she said “Oh my breeder…” “My groomer…” no. There are Credentialed vet staff in Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine. Also there are Poison and Toxic lists that you can research.

  • Not a bad list.
    But I doubt that most preppers would know how to use most of those tools.
    I think you should reconsider dividing it into basic and advanced categories to make it more prepper friendly.
    The Diagnostic kit, except for the stethoscope, is not likely to be used by any one, other that an actual doctor.
    Much of this stuff is beyond even what most EMT or Ambulances carry and use. Other than OTC meds , Antibiotic’s, wound closure and dressing items, most of it is beyond the scope and ability of an individual family or a lone prepper.

    I would also recommend skipping all the digital tools for traditional versions. Once the batteries are dead and/or you run out of replacements they will be useless.
    True SHTF is not a one or two year ordeal, it is a long term ( like 10 or more years) ordeal. Get tools that will last and get a couple of them, in case one breaks.

    • If you have the budget and storage space for them, I see some value in having a few tools and books above one’s own skill and knowledge level, whether they be medical, auto mechanic, electronic repair, or whatever. In an SHTF situation you may be able to find someone else with the skill set to use them and work out ongoing barter deals for goods and/or services, or just use them for one-time trade goods. Obviously, acquiring such items is normally lower priority than equipping up to your own skill level.

      • -Navig8r,
        As others and I have mentioned, while having some supplies or items are good to have, formal training is more important.

        That is something MIC has never had.

    • I beg to disagree. If you have those advanced tools, they can be used by your neighbor who might be a doctor or retired doctor (but didn’t tell anyone). My kids use solar charges for their flashlight batteries. I’ve broken many a mercury temperature-takers. (Don’t tell the EPA) If nothing else, you could sell that stuff to someone who knows someone who can use it. Maybe for food.

      • Spare batteries for all devices should be a part of our preps, and solar chargers are a great idea to.
        Some diagnostics, like a pulse oximeter don’t have a manual unpowered version. Same with my portable EKG I have.
        I agree with you. Some of these items could be useful as barter too.
        I would ditch the Tuning Forks as they’re of no use in field medicine diagnostics.

    • {{{{{{{ Aleve is a good one for all these pesky lil variants purportedly floating around. {{{{{{{NAPROXEN ANTIVIRAL SARS}}}}}}}

  • Thanks for a great list! For those who wish to take first aid/cpr classes, consider your local technical college if you have one. Some hospitals used to teach these things but that may have changed with Covid. The Stop the bleed campaign teaches people how to stop people from bleeding out. I’m sure there are others.

    Regarding the right of doctors to refuse service to the unvaccinated, I totally support them. I totally support the right of people to refuse the vaccine, but don’t expect your health care provider to pay for your choices with you. Please note that I have no plans to argue this position; at this point we’ve all done our research and made our decision, and I believe in personal freedom. It’s everyone’s right to refuse the vaccine. It’s the doctor’s right to refuse to watch someone die from this. These people are well past exhausted after two years of Covid. Give them a break! They’re human beings too and any human can only take so much before breaking. So be kind! Make your choice and live (or die) with it. But don’t blame the physician. /End discussion.

    • Medical Coercion is a violation of the Nuremberg Code. They hung Nazi’s for this.
      Not that you care. If these people don’t like treating patients, they should take up gardening instead, and threating refusal of service, termination from jobs, forced quarantines, as a sword hanging over the heads of people that make a different medical decision than you is the definition of Authoritarian Coercion.
      They hung Nazi’s for lesser crimes.

      End of discussion is the proper way to put this, because we all know what happens after people stop talking.

      Get some help before you go full concentration camp on your neighbors.

      • I agree. Jane is simply ignorant about the overwhelming amount of doctors, surgeons, physicians, and nurses who would rather lose their job than take an experimental mRNA gene therapy shot posing as a vaccine and which has now injured and killed more people than (a yet to be isolated) SARS-CoV-2 virus. Also, she is clearly ignorant of the Hippocratic oath. Additionally, poor Jayne also doesn’t realize that the odds of her dying sooner than those she believes should join her by taking the shots has exponentially increased. She bases her conclusions on subjective reasoning rather than objective scientific research. But such is the mind of the Left today. “WE LIVE IN TIMES WHERE SMART PEOPLE ARE SILENCED SO THAT STUPID PEOPLE WON’T BE OFFENDED.”

    • We think alike on this matter Jayne. Medical professional can do choose to not prescribe/perform some surgeries. In my mind, this is no different – deeply held personal belief.

    • Ah. So you support medical apartheid. If you get your wish, do you think it will end there? 80+% of deaths occurred in obese people. They may be next to be cut off. 480,000 people in America die each year from tobacco-related issues. Maybe they’d be next.

      Stop watching CNN. Doctors and nurses aren’t as overworked as MSM would have you believe. In the midst of the ‘fourth wave’ a city of 800,000 near me has exactly three (3) people in hospital DUE to Covid.

    • I can agree with your position. Dr’s that refuse medical treatment are going against their oath. They have choices to make too. But where is our ‘choice’ to get the therapeutic medicines that we KNOW already exist, you know the ones I refer to. Why are we restricted access to them? They should be OTC as they are in many other countries. We are left to die by ‘protocol meds’ that don’t work, when the drugs that will cure us are denied. Fix that problem and the Dr’s that won’t see the un-vaxxed can go fuck themselves.

    • I agree. I refuse to treat anyone who can’t prove that they’ve had the measles, hepatitis, meningitis vaccines or current flu shot and a current negative STD test. The Hippocratic Oath be damned! Hah! (sarc)

  • Speaking from one who had a part of a finger bitten off by a dog.I would add Medical scissors, they are off-set, with a blunt tip. Yea its another $10.00 or so, but they were invaluable when cutting gauze ect.

    FYI I had 2 dressing changes a day for about 2 weeks. with the gauze, before I healed enough to go a band-aid.

    Also burn jel. I really does work for burns.

    I have a hands free lighted magnifying glass for splinters and anything else that needs a closer look.

  • Good list!

    I also would add to get as much formal training, first aid, EMT-B and if you can Wilderness EMT. The Wilderness EMT course was insight into what it would be like in post-SHTF without access to modern medicine, labs or facilities.
    There are still some low end, basic biology instruments, tools, testing you can do.
    I do my own fecal testing on the goats for worms using nothing more basic high school lab supplies, Epson salt, and a micro-scope (cost me less than $100).
    You can do the same test for worm testing for you dogs too, but it is a bit on the odorous side. Save ya $45 at the vets office.

  • Cayenne Pepper (Bulk) Poor Man’s Clotting Agent
    “Thieves” Essential Oil Mixture (From the era of the Black Plague) Decent anti-microbial and antiseptic. Redmond Salt, Lemmon/Lime juice and water as a hydration drink.
    Imodium AD or MRE Peanut Butter (Cement for the Butt! – I used after food poisoning in Egypt)

  • What about herbal and homeopathic remedies, like Arnica, Frankincense, Calendula, Feverfew, White Willow Bark, etc.? Much less harmful to the body.

  • I am not giving medical advice here , just passing along a tip given to me years ago by an old country doctor on stoping diarrhea with no medicine involved. Boil rice with twice the amount of water you would usually use .Boil the rice until it is tender and then strain and give the remaining water orally. Like with anything, you should always check with your doctor before using , when ever possible.

    • I am retired army, but my bosses in the military were all Veterinarians. They had me boil rice and ground beef for diarrhea for my dogs. It has always worked. For poultry try VetRX. It has many uses and good to have on hand.

  • What you have in your medical supplies will depend on your medical knowledge. The diagnostic kit may well be something that a nurse, or somebody with some medical training, may want to get, but probably not everyone will have the knowledge to use it. On the other hand, if you know about herbal medicine, it’s quite possible that your supplies will include a number of useful herbal supplements, or even herbs that you have collected yourself. I personally have helped family members with herbs I collected myself, after the doctor didn’t have anything to offer, or recommended a supplement that didn’t help much.

    On the question of the Hippocratic oath: there is actually a time when it doesn’t apply, and that is when doctors are in a triage situation. Doctors often have limited resources, and covid just happens to be a disease that needs either very little, in a mild case, or a lot of resources, if the patient needs to be hospitalized. So a doctor is in their right, if they have limited resources, to refuse to treat those patients likely to need a lot of resources, and even more so if they have previously refused other medical treatment, such as a vaccine. Jehovah’s Witnesses are rather familiar with this problem. People who choose to refuse the vaccine on religious or other grounds should familiarise themselves with the experience of Jehovah’s Witnesses and make their decisions in the full knowledge of the consequences. My impression is that most people who choose not to vaccinate do so without really being aware of the likely consequences and preparing for them. And as preppers, we should be rightfully ashamed of failing to prepare.

    • The ‘likely consequences’ of not being vaccinated are not much. The death rate from this virus is minimal and less if you’re healthy and fit. The consequences of getting vaccinated are much more severe.

      • I don’t think she was talking about the medical “consequences” of avoiding the vaccine but of the other government imposed kind.

  • Another thing I’ve found handy for skin irritations, diaper rash, etc… Boudreaux’s Butt Paste. Along the same lines, Domeboro is good for chicken pox, shingles, and rashes.

  • crutches, wheelchair, aloe vera plant, book on healing herbs, equipment to make tinctures and teas, empty capsules and equipment to fill them, dedicated sick room/area. white sheets, equipment to sterilize, and all the great stuff already added by others.

  • On the subject of dental care, teeth can kill as fast as a blood wound. I have several crowns and keep emergency crown adhesive around. Found it at my market on clearance last year. Also, witch hazel works as well as rubbing alcohol. I have several home medicine books and used a baking soda pack on my elderly neighbor last year when his prescribed med wasn’t working for his infection. 2x daily for 4 days and he was good as new. Now, that doesn’t mean go off medications, just that the pack helped them work better. Final note, super glue is a liquid bandage. I have Self-aid Buddy care training from the service and its been more handy than I would have imagined!

  • Ring cutter

    Smash a finger and it WILL swell. You may not be able to remove the ring without cutting or risk losing the finger. Here is a link to Amazon. Ring cutters are not expensive
    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=ring+cutter&ref=nb_sb_noss
    Not that I recommend Amazon, it’s a hard item to locate locally. Not all medical supply places sell to the public.
    For an alternative to stitches, consider medical staples. The disposable staplers can be found under veterinary supplies but work fine for people. Look for a kit with the remover included. They are for external use only. ONLY stitch or staple a CLEANED and DISINFECTED wound!!!
    Consider blood clotting powders. They come in little packets. Great for a bleeding wound before bandaging.
    Tourniquets, but only for those with training or extensive reading on how to use them.
    Strongly suggest books and supplies for childbirth. You may not need it, but are likely to run across someone who will.
    Toothache medicine – Ora-gel comes to mind.
    If you plan on stitching someone up, you will also need scissors for stitches removal.
    Material for slings (broken/sprained arms).
    Foldable litter for carrying someone or learn to make one with a blanket and two poles.

  • In an emergent situation you can use an old fashioned pressure cooker, or an Instapot if you have electricity, to sterilize gauze, surgical instruments, or even strips of cloth to use as bandages. Just bring to pressure and hold for 20 minutes.

    Of course, you can also make a mean pot roast with the same pressure cooker.

  • I know not everyone has the money. I do things more on a natural basis. Dr. Jones has a kit that may be of use to some. This is on my wish list as soon as I can afford it:

    https://homegrownherbalist.net/product/wound-suture-ammo-can-kit/
    The HomeGrown Herbalist Wound & Suture Kit contains herbal preparations and surgical instruments helpful in wound management. All the formulas were formulated by Dr. Patrick Jones. Formulas and Tinctures were made by HomeGrown Herbalist staff. Includes laminated instructions on how to use all tinctures and powders.

  • Don’t forget an extra 30 day supply (minimum) of any prescription medications you take on a daily or regular basis! Most of our meds are supplied by companies in China. Also, get into as good physical condition as you can ASAP. The more overweight or out of condition you are, the more difficult, and possibly even dangerous, it will be do any activities requiring serious exertion. Can you walk a mile, or two? Or three? Can you do it with a 15 pound backpack?

  • When I came back to the world I had jungle rot that wouldn’t go away. For years, it would spread up my legs and into my groin and I was in agony. The VA couldn’t cure it. Civilian DRs. couldn’t cure it, and in desperation I tried Arrid Extra Extra dry. It disappeared in 2 days and never came back. I have reccomended it for every skin infection someone may have, and I have had reports from many people of 100% success. At

      • Do a manual copy. Highlight the whole thing in blue manually. Word will filter out everything else. Stop at the picture maybe at the top. Then copy the title in later. I copy manually from the bottom up.

    • Thank you. I found a yellow spray can of this at Walmart. Hopefully this is the correct one. I will attach a Post-It note with the off-label uses commenters have mentioned here.

      I also find off-label uses very interesting.

  • its the height of wild lettuce right now we started useing it for pain and sleep if I can do it anyone can our old garden is loaded with it .
    One full plastic shopping bag chopped fine, we use food processor. We use half as much water as plant material , and use an old crackpot set on low for 24hrs strain it and cook liquid down NEVER BOIL. Some say use alchohol but I’m a recovering alcoholic so we just slow cook it down it gives you between a quart or pint we store in canning hars in fridge we drink one drink at bed time amazing sleep and works good for most pain a went from several ibprophen a day to none. And I have bade arthritis from construction and a fall. I would have laughed if I didn’t try it. Great thing is its totally free and legal. Now some dry it and smoke it or dry it and make a tea from it the blacker the water after the better . Its very bitter but remember GOD gave us a plant for all illness just study. If you are afraid you will pick the wrong plant google it and lookalikes lettuce has a pinkish stem that grows like dandelions. Both perfectly edible. I found a free way to help identify wild plants double click google a microphone and a camera pop up center the plant take a picture and it tells you what they have on line . Also works for antiques and other items you wonder what they are. I wll say never trust google to give you a 100 % proof of identifying wild plants. But if you are poor like me, I can’t afford expensive wild edible apps that use basically the same pictures that google has for free. Remember always do the touch and wait then chew a tiny bit and wait then if it doesn’t burn or numb your mouth swallow a tiny bit and wait I always do this with even edibles I’m almost certian with. Some times they look different so I test them . Also plantain is everywhere and good for skin issues. The flower stems when gathered young are better then asparagus in my mind

  • I didn’t see duct tape and para cord or adjustable splints. You may not think of that for your medical kit but if you break something you will need a way to bind it up.
    Lots of medical tape and 4×4 gauze. Hydrogen peroxide is a little hard on the skin but better than nothing.
    Find a neighbor who is a doctor or a nurse if you can. They will be invaluable in a shtf situation.

    • -H2DoughBoy,
      But, why find a neighbor who is a doctor or nurse?
      There are a lot of first aid classes out there, EMT classes that anyone can take to get similar training or experience.
      As I have learned in my Wilderness EMT class/certification, take away the modern labs, facilities, and hospitals, even doctors are back at late 1800s early 1900s medicine.
      That is coming from a doctor who was in my Wilderness EMT class.

      If you have passed a high school biology class, chem, or even AP Antimony and Physiology class (as I did), there is a lot of medical classes that you can gain.
      Contrary to popular belief, you can get the knowledge and training here and now to further yourself for medical things post SHTF.
      If you put your mind to it, you can accomplish anything.

  • I remember when it was illegal for health care workers to refuse to work on an AIDS patient. When did that change??? That’s when we started wearing gloves. I think that was 1985–ish.

  • Is there a “print” button for your list? I tried to do it on my computer “print” option and it said “37 pages. It must have included all the comments.

  • a must for sore muscles Absorbine Veterinary Liniment Gel for horses. I’ve been using it for years after my GP told me about it 8 years ago

  • Thanks, this is wheely usefool. IF they stop deleting my comments here.

    I also very highly recommend Tylenol or acetaminophen but not Ibuprofen. It once saved me from going to the ER and god knows I might have had an organ removed so thank you Lord.

    I could go on what to have on this list but it would be just like his accept to say make sure you have Iodine too at minimum. Yeah, I could say hydrogen peroxide, or alcohol but believe you me make sure you have iodine.

  • Cloves and clove oil for tooth and gun pains and issues. I use it on my “receeding gums” for pain. When you live in the rural remote with the nearest dentist over 50 miles away….

  • Chris or Daisy, have you all heard of ivermectin? I understand it to be a viral preventative? And a person can obtain it at a feed store.

      • Very right, NotSelena. Then make this little 30-seconds experiment, type “graphene vaccines” in Google and then type the same two words in Qwant. I guess your will drop Google for ever.

  • This list is nothing more than a big pharma lover’s dream. All of the medications listed will cause cancer. I came to this blog for the first time looking for useful information, but now I can rename this place ‘the big pharma loving prepper’. There’s absolutely nothing organic about the poison listed in this ‘article’

    • Hey, there Caca. Thanks for your eloquent critique and your sweeping view that ALL of the medications listed will cause cancer.

      This article is about over-the-counter meds, tools, and wound care supplies. We have other articles coming about herbal medications, fish antibiotics to keep a healthy aquarium, and off-label uses for common medications. I’m certainly not compelling you to purchase any of these things. I believe in a combination of modern and natural medicine. This is not a book. It’s not comprehensive. It’s an article on a blog. There’ll be more articles.

      • Thank you Daisy. I had to laugh when I read that person’s comment as well as your response. I also noted that their website link fails to go anywhere…tried it more than once.

        In most cases, I prefer organic/herbal medicine but do realize that they work slowly. When in a SHTF situation, time, pain management, stopping the bleed, etc are all crucial. My view is that I want all options available, including western medicine. Looking forward to the other articles you mentioned. 🙂

  • DON’T forget Potassium Iodine or IOSAT, in case of any nuclear fallout…
    Unfortunately, you can NOT safely give this to your pets.
    Crazy glue is also something very useful in closing smaller wounds. (stings like all h*ll but, works) We use it all the time on our livestock, split ears, etc. Same as when the dogs have “gotten into it” and need to have an ear split repaired.

  • Disposable razors. I like the small pack from dollar tree. It’s hard to stitch some places without shaving it.
    Remove hair away from infected areas for cleaner views etc.

  • These medicines will eventually run out, so I’ve been working this year to learn about and grow herbs. I’m trying to heave at least 1 backyard option for each category – – something for stomach ache, something for respiratory, something for wounds, etc. I hope to build rapidly on my knowledge and plant collection!

  • I’m glad you noted Naproxen however it is sooo much more than a humble pain reliever! Simply look up NAPROXEN ANTIVIRAL SARS or NAPROXEN ANTIVIRAL INFLUENZA and you will see it’s the blocker of rna viruses. It worked for me ;-).

  • I also recommend having multiple types of eye drops on hand.

    I see the recommendation above for the eye wash & had to use my eye wash yesterday. I managed to scratch my eye & was in a LOT of pain. I want some eye drops that will deaden pain but have not found one yet. I’ve ordered some of the Similasan brand to try.

  • Colloidal Silver would be probably one of the greatest medical preps you could ever possibly buy! Go to thesilveredge.com to get started. Read the testimonials page and order one of these great little machines!

  • Chris, I would add Witch Hazel solution to the list of skin irritation supplies. It’s a well documented astringent and soothing to irritated skin. I would also add a few bottles of 90% Isopropyl alcohol to the kit (if you need to sterilize instruments it’s much more effective, and it can be used as a fuel source).
    As a former Paramedic and Trauma RN, I’ve a whole list of other additions to my supplies, but without the training, using them would be beyond most people’s skill set.
    Your list is a very good starting point for preppers.
    Drip Drop ORS makes an excellent oral rehydration mix to aid in dehydration or blood loss events. I’ve attached the link here. As they are in powder form, they take up very little room in kits/bags, and are sized to add to the common 20 Oz bottle of water.
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07NRBN6WG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_glt_fabc_XYP6F62N9YR9D6EH79CY

  • Thank you for the list. We can add two important circumstancial medications: Hydroxychloroquine sulfate and Ivermectine, if they are not forbidden in your country. As for the Hydroxychloroquine, one treatment per person can go from 2000 mg (Dr Zelenko) to 6000 mg (Dr Raoult). As for the Ivermectine, about 250 mg per person and per treatment (five times 0,6 mg per kg of weight). They can be taken together in case of Wuhan disease, since the HCQ prevents the entrance of the virus into the cells, and the Iver prevents the replication of the virus. HCQ can be taken preventively (in smaller dose), as it is done in malaria areas, and Iver can be taken (the normal dose) when somebody got the virus in the household, dividing by ten the probability for the rest of the family to get it.

  • Since somebody mentions eye drops, I have a recipe to mention, which doesn’t imply the previous storage of any specific ingredient. It’s the physiologic solution, or water salted at the same density as our body liquids, meaning theoretically 9 grams of sodium chloride per liter of water, in practice two little flat (not rounded) tea spoons of kitchen salt per liter. This antiseptic can be used to clean a wound, but also to clean one’s nose when coming back home from a Wuhan-infected city. Each member of the household has his own little plastic mustard or ketchup dispenser full of this saline solution, and uses it to send a little jet into his nostril and then blow it off. Remember that the virus comes through the respiratory way, in the digestive one it gets destroyed. No worry, this little cleaning is much nicer than getting sea water in one’s throat when swimming. Being antiseptic, the solution keeps for months.

  • Is there a general ‘cure all’ antibiotic we should be trying to get ? Preferably OTC, but if not, anyway common symptom we could ‘acquire’ to get hands on it ?

    I’m concerned with infection

    Amoxicillin or penicillin for example ?

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