The 2 Most Important Things I Learned When the SHTF in Venezuela

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Hello again fellows.

It’s has been a while since our last interaction.

Some health issues have knocked me down on my back, literally, this last week, but here I am again. Stress seems to be charging a toll on me.

Let’s go straight to the topic now. I know this is not something I usually do, you’re right.

If there is something that looks like SHTF, it is the extreme change of the situation we faced. I will elaborate a small prelude for those readers unaware of our story. I had a good life back there in Venezuela, until 3 or 4 years ago. Living in an already paid for house, in a good subdivision, a city the exact size not too big not too small..good medical care, good salary, a great job. In less than one year (a few months, indeed) all of that is gone. Couple relationship, everything. A total extension, all of a sudden, life reset. And a bugout getting through two foreign countries, now becoming increasingly violent against us migrants.

Through all of this, I have learned that there are two things that you should never take for granted.

Your health is always going to be good (or even acceptably good).

I have been healthy most of my life, and I pray the Lord to keep me this way. However, this is unpredictable for us. I have been trying to eat healthily and avoid abusing my health, but there are genetic components that are just going to be there to jump in some given moment in our life. I had taken some precautions, indeed, but not exactly related to my health, nor had plans disclosing what to do if I got sick. After all, I had full coverage insurance, issued by the oil company I worked in, but that is ancient history now. Not even the actual employees enjoy that insurance. Medical care officers of the company tell them to go to the public hospitals. Go figure. We knew this was coming, though.

Of course, putting together some medical supplies is easy. Training, practicing a drill every now and then, not so easy. Much harder is going to be getting proper treatments or surgeries when we need them. Already in 2016, it was difficult to find the antibiotics, analgesics and other medicines, therefore, I could not get the surgery I (still) need. That’s why it becomes so important to look for natural, organic ways to treat some illnesses. Maybe these are not going to act as fast as western industrial pharmacology, but we could surprise ourselves of the results. It is a known fact that plenty of modern medication derives from ancient herbology. With much less collateral effects sometimes, I have trust in this kind of medicine. I have tried, indeed, therefore I can state that it can work.

It´s almost impossible to plan taking into account your potential health problems. But something you can do is to plan including YOUR own potential incapacity no matter the reason for this. As the head of the family, most of the planning depended on me: defense, resource management, vehicles, and communications.

Had I have been taken down temporarily (or permanently) for whatever reason, things could get hairy for the rest of the clan (women and children mostly). If you plan for everything you could imagine, remember including a heart attack. If you are young and healthy, it´s ok, maybe you could skip this part. But most of us are not in a position to do it. And under stress circumstances, it´s very likely that, if hot lead starts to fly from here to there and back, some of these problems are going to arise, even after the event. Include in your general plans the possibility of being partially disabled because of a wound or an illness. And make a drill for this. These last few days I´ve been to rely heavily on my ex-wife even for getting some food, as I can’t walk comfortably out of my rented room. Go figure. This said, make sure you have some options if you find yourself impeded for a period of time.

Your surroundings are always going to be peaceful.

Maybe you haven’t read the news about what is going on in this part of the world, but right now, things are not exactly doing well. In Ecuador, civil unrest with looting and violence has been present this last few weeks. We are far away from that country (Ecuador), but some episodes of increasing aggression against Venezuelans in Peru are starting to make us take some precautions. Being unable to even walk a few dozen meters these days, much less defend myself…I would have been in a very delicate and troublesome position if I were to be in the streets with my younger kid when some type of assault came on my way. This is the worst moment in my life for (yet another) bugout, with much less money and my health being like it is now. Self-defense is easy when you can move freely without being in discomfort and pain.

Relationships between migrants and nationals have been stressed, as this process of uncontrolled migration is not exactly beneficial for both societies. They are logically uncomfortable, with some exceptions that have been able to hire highly prepared professionals paying them a few coins, of course. And we, on the other hand, forced to leave our own country for the good of our families. Getting ahead of those who say “Why don’t you fight then?” because the illegal execution forces will kick down your door and shot in the head to anyone who they suspect is part of a resistance movement. They have imprisoned high-rank officers, killed captains of the army, and so on. This was told to the world before, and all we received was a look to the other side. These guys are now cutting deals with North Korea, and that implies the opening of a spy office for the entire company, located in a very rich country with hundreds of coastal land to receive any kind of materials. I certainly hope that the entire continent does not pay the consequences of this later, as there were warning signs enough to be scared as h***k.

OK let’s go back to the topic. We were somehow surprised upon our arrival to Lima, that we could walk more or less without too many risks (compared to Venezuela of course). We heard this neighborhood was not exactly the best in town, but it seems to have improved on the personal security area. There are police patrol cars all over the place, and they seem to do their job with efficiency. An occasional cellphone/wallet robbery, mainly because of your average neighborhood junky looking for his next dose. The kind of turmoil I am deeply afraid of is, indeed, the race biased one…and that is exactly the one that seems to be spreading. I know, from my own experience how many disturbed people are roaming in the streets of every city I have been. I have seen in Quito walking in front of me disfigured women with incredible burning scares, women that sometime were young and pretty, just because they refused to pay attention to some psycho that ended igniting them alive. I heard stories from reliable sources of young men in Caracas being shot in front of their parents, just for fun while the robbers laughed and got away. I see news in the provinces outside Lima, where Venezuelans have been lynched by an angry mob, some of them being catch up while stealing…and some others just because they have a pretty girlfriend. And the attitude “That can’t happen here” or “That will not happen to us” is long gone in my survival manual, trust me.

As usual, I have a theory about this. Maybe I’m wrong, but I have a hunch. And I am going to abuse your trust, to make this public announcement, because it is what I believe is happening.

The red gang behind the engineered collapse of Venezuela never thought that people were going to leave in those numbers, and so fast. Venezuela is somehow unpredictable, after all. They trusted in taking the population down to a number they could manage with fear, and in a few generations, they would be entirely owning the minds of the people (according to their twisted Stalinist logic). But the exodus was too much and they don’t have personnel able to take some specialized and other not so specialized jobs. Now they want them back. What are they going to do to make people come back? Easy…by using the only weapon they know: fear. By manipulating mobs with their local cells (and please don’t tell me this is my imagination because we know they exist), they can ignite turmoil and generate fear enough within the migrants to make coming back a few thousand. Then, these will be registered and impeding to leave again. Then, they will repeat the process to capture people with special skills in several areas and will offer privileges. Car, apartments, food rations. It worked in the Soviet era. Maybe they plan to do it in this world, as different as it is.

Once they have filled up their numbers, they could close the borders and try (I mean try) to become a sort of North Korea. Closing the borders, and surrounding themselves with missiles, becoming a real threat for the entire continent. They’re stupid enough to try to do it, just in case you haven’t noticed it.

What do you think?

Have you learned unexpected lessons through hard times? Which things have you learned not to take for granted? Please share your thoughts in the comments.

About Jose

Jose is an upper middle class professional. He is a former worker of the oil state company with a Bachelor’s degree from one of the best national Universities. He has a small 4 members family, plus two cats and a dog. An old but in good shape SUV, a good 150 square meters house in a nice neighborhood, in a small but (formerly) prosperous city with two middle size malls. Jose is a prepper and shares his eyewitness accounts and survival stories from the collapse of his beloved Venezuela. Thanks to your help Jose has gotten his family out of Venezuela. They are currently setting up a new life in another country. Follow Jose on YouTube and gain access to his exclusive content on Patreon. Donations: paypal.me/JoseM151

The 2 Most Important Things I Learned When the SHTF in Venezuela
J.G. Martinez D

J.G. Martinez D

About Jose Jose is an upper middle class professional. He is a former worker of the oil state company with a Bachelor’s degree from one of the best national Universities. He has a small 4 members family, plus two cats and a dog. An old but in good shape SUV, a good 150 square meters house in a nice neighborhood, in a small but (formerly) prosperous city with two middle size malls. Jose is a prepper and shares his eyewitness accounts and survival stories from the collapse of his beloved Venezuela. Thanks to your help Jose has gotten his family out of Venezuela. They are currently setting up a new life in another country. Follow Jose on YouTube and gain access to his exclusive content on Patreon. Donations: paypal.me/JoseM151

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  • Reading your and Selco’s works I’m reminded of what my dad likes to say (we’re immigrants to Canada): people are the same everywhere, with the same needs, hopes, and problems.

    If this is how people in poorer countries deal with SHTF conditions, what will people in wealthier countries do? The same things, with only a few minor variations. Makes you think…

    • Don’t kid yourself and don’t let other people kid you either. There are some very nasty and dangerous people out there and even those who think they have good intentions during times of ease and prosperity can become some really mean and and nasty individuals when opportunity knocks as in war, famine and poverty.

  • Jose, i am very sorry to hear that your marriage has been a casualty of the Venezuelan collapse. I am glad you and your former wife still have enough of a relationship that she is helping you now when you are disabled. I am also sorry to hear of your health problems. I am sure your poor health is also due to the stress of the Venezuelan collapse. I hope that there are better times ahead for you. Yes, i am sure that SHTF also often involves losing one’s marriage and health in the chaos. You are a brave and strong man.

    • Dear Maggie,

      Despite all of our problems, I can’t complain of her support. She’s prepared me special meals I need, fruits and vegetables, and brought them to my rented bedroom, and bought my medicines (I can not walk a lot without discomfort).

      It’s somehow sad to see the concerns in my kiddo’s little face, but I think someday he had to realize his dad was not always to be the 1-101-character-like,dressed in leather that took him to his school in his motorcycle. Hopefully this will teach him to eat healthy and exercise, and never smoking.

      Thanks for your kind words. You encourage me to keep walking and fighting.

  • Your health is definitely something you can not take for granted. My husband was apparently in good health and he suddenly got very ill from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome which took months to diagnose. He went from working 50 hours a week for FedEx to nothing. Our income went from good to nothing. Luckily I was able to find employment. But his illness was nothing we had ever considered.

    As far as having to move some place very different, my family did that when I was 8 years old. Now, you probably will have had to live in the Southern US 60 years ago to really understand this story. We moved from Los Angeles , CA to Columbus, GA. My teacher was so old that she had grown up just after Reconstruction had ended. I was considered a Yankee – which was the lowest of the low there. In 6 weeks I had developed a Southern accent so thick you could cut it with a knife, but I then fit in. I know this isn’t near as serious as you are dealing with, but maybe it will make you smile.

  • Good article that should make us all think in new ways about survival. Good to consider health problems and possible injury. At 72 with an 81 year old husband with Alzheimer’s, I have to consider health concerns and injuries from the get go. I can not walk far at a time. My husbands wonders in fear hunting for me if I’m out of sight. It may be I’d choose to be a diversion so my younger family could escape if such became the case. I’ve taught my kids a lot. Much more they need to know. Each preps to some degree. My rural home is home base for part of them If SHTF.
    I try to think of any possibilities and how to handle them.
    I’m beginning to write down things for the kids and grandkids to know about survival. I show my grandson wild foods. I hope he remembers some.
    I want local foods and medicines and techniques for this climate to be a part of their knowledge base.

  • Jose I pray for you and all in such situations to have God’s help and comfort. Also I pray for health and strength as you learn natural ways to heal.
    Your survival and sharing the story is an inspiration to be stronger and better prepared.

    • Dear Clergylady,

      People like you, your grown children and your grandkids are the main reason I write for. Trust me.

      God as witness.

      Thanks, and kiss those grandkids for me, hug them and pamper them as there is no tomorrow.

  • Jose, I am very sorry to hear your marriage did not survive the exodus from Venezuela. Also sorry to hear that your health is not good.

    I was experiencing multiple health problems until I adopted a ketogenic diet, then all my aches / pains / fatigue were eliminated. I am 60 years old and in better health than some 40 year old people I know.

    I wish you all the best and also thank you for the insight your posts on OP provide to those of us still privileged enough to have stability on a daily basis.

    Thanks to you, I know never to take it for granted.

    • Dear Admin User,

      I have been reading about ketogenic diet, and its approach seems very logical to me. My diet is usually rich in proteins, much better than the months I spent in Ecuador. As soon as I can I am starting with it too, trust me. And I will recommend to anyone out there to make their own research and try it.

      Thanks for your good wishes, and I love how you appreciate what I have to say.

  • Jose, if you are saved through a relationship with Jesus Christ, the enemy has no power over you. Only what you give him by speaking curses upon yourself with your tongue and speaking negatively about your health..

    Galatians 3:13

    “Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth on a tree:

    14 That the blessing of Abraham might come on the Gentiles through Jesus Christ; that we might receive the promise of the Spirit through faith.”

    These are the curses your redeemed from, Deuteronmy 28:15-68

    59 “Then the Lord will make thy plagues wonderful, and the plagues of thy seed, even great plagues, and of long continuance, and sore sicknesses, and of long continuance.

    60 Moreover he will bring upon thee all the diseases of Egypt, which thou wast afraid of; and they shall cleave unto thee.

    61 Also every sickness, and every plague, which is not written in the book of this law, them will the Lord bring upon thee, until thou be destroyed,”

    Don’t profess the problems, profess the answers, profess the promises.

    • @Ken: Ken, when your relationship with Jesus fails to save you from cancer, a stroke, a heart attack, etc., you will be the only surprised person.

    • Dear Ken,

      That’s a great advice!

      And yes, Jesus and Me have a very special relationship, indeed. He’s taken of me pretty well and I always feel him close.

  • Dear José,
    I’m so sorry to hear of your troubles, and please know that I (and many others here) will be keeping you and your family in our prayers.
    Have you ever thought about emigrating to the USA? For someone with your qualifications, work should be fairly easy to find; even if you need to wait until your health improves, there are some excellent safety nets in our public assistance programs to help you out while you recover.
    Whatever you decide to do, may God bless you and your family and keep you in the palm of His hand.

    • dear Kitty,

      Thanks for your kind words. Yes, I´ve been thinking on that, indeed. There´s a scholarship program I found out about, but for 2020 applications were already filled up. I will apply for 2021 though. I have several friends that migrated to the USA and I sure can count with them for a while until I can settle down. However, my faith is strong and I am sure we will see a full recovery soon in the country. I would love to go to the USA, buying an used RV and spend some time admiring those wonderful landscapes.
      I have been extremely well received in several other forums by USA people. It´s interesting to see that people my age or above seem to understand exactly what we are going through.

      I would like to give some presentations, too, about how important was prepping for our bugging out without too much hassle. Most of the unprepared had it rough. We were lucky, but had taken precautions that allowed us to deal with some of the worst.
      Thanks, and yes, God always has protected us all. Blessings for you too, you´re very kind.

  • A wider and deeper reading of the history of Venezuela’s troubles would lead you to question the assumption that they are the result of Communism and Socialism, the CIA’s fingerprints are all over events in your country the last fifty years, endemic corruption in Venezuela was a bleeding wound, and the CIA the fingers that ripped it open, Chavez and Maduro only serving as the clowns presiding over the funeral.

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