The Importance of Having Prepper Friends

You’ve probably all heard that old success adage that warns, “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” The guy credited with saying this was Jim Rohn, who is widely accepted as the world’s top business philosopher. But don’t overlook it, because it’s true of all facets of life, not just business. In fact, it’s why I suggest you have prepper friends.

How our friends influence us

No matter who you are, you’re still influenced by the people with whom you spend the most time. You tend to prioritize the things that are consistently mentioned and practiced, so if you get together with a few friends to do some canning or to work on a bug-out property, not only are you bonding, but you’re practicing important skills.

When your friends support prepping as a positive and reasonable activity, you’ll be a lot more likely to focus on it regularly. After all, it’s a lot of fun to share a great score of kerosene lamps at a yard sale with people who will actually join you in your excitement.

On the other hand, if your peers constantly denigrate or mock your preparedness efforts, it can be quite demotivating. Who wants to be the object of rolled eyes and deep sighs all the time? You may stick with your efforts in private, but being surrounded by folks like this can make what you’re doing feel far less important – or even ridiculous.

Motivation and encouragement can’t be overlooked as the impetus to help you become better prepared.

What if you don’t know any preppers?

The funny thing about prepper friends is that they’re not always “preppers.”  While it can be awesome to find a group of people who share your interests completely, it isn’t always practical.

That doesn’t mean you can’t be surrounded by supportive peers. Look for folks who practice the skills we prize, like…

  • Homesteading
  • Gardening
  • Herbalism
  • Food preservation
  • Wildcrafting
  • Foraging
  • Hiking
  • Bushcraft
  • Sewing
  • Knitting
  • Living history groups
  • Soapmaking
  • Beekeeping
  • CERT or other community preparedness training
  • Volunteer paramedic or firefighting
  • Volunteer search and rescue

…You get the idea.

While they may not have a bug-out bag, you’ll probably have a lot more in common with these people than folks who live for the next episode of Rich Person “Reality” TV.

Some of my very favorite people to hang out with were folks I met in a homesteading group back when I lived in California. While we didn’t share all the same philosophies, our love of self-reliance and sharing of skills created a strong, lifelong bond.

Find prepper friends online

Barring real life friends, groups online can be a wonderful way to touch base with others who share your views. (Always be cautious about sharing too much personal information with anyone you meet online – heck, in person, too!)

Look for forums, busy comments sections on blogs, or (if you’re into social media) groups on Facebook or Google. (You can join my Facebook group Prep Club by going here and answering the questions.) We have a lot of great discussions, monthly motivation challenges, and conversations about a variety of scenarios. It’s so much fun to share the stuff you canned or something you built with people who will be as excited as you are. What’s more, as a group, we can offer support and suggestions when you run into a stumbling block.

While online friends aren’t quite like in-person friends, if you’re feeling isolated, it can be a great way to find a supportive circle.

The importance of OPSEC

OPSEC is an acronym for OPerational SECurity, and the term was coined by American military forces during the Vietnam war. The basic idea is to protect small pieces of information that could be put together to form a bigger picture. With regard to prepping, it means that you never want others to know things like:

  • How many supplies you have
  • Where you keep your supplies
  • What specific supplies you stash
  • What your home defense strategies are

And in some cases, you won’t want them to know that you’re a prepper at all.

You get the idea.  Don’t make yourself vulnerable, even to people you consider friends. Unless you have known someone a long time, been through crises with them, and fully trust them, there are some things you should keep to yourself.

Do you have prepper friends?

Of course, you’re always welcome to chat here in the comments section. I strongly encourage it!

Are your friends and family also involved with prepping? If not, have you made efforts to meet others who are into the preparedness lifestyle? Do you have some ideas how we can meet likeminded people? Please share you thoughts in the comments section below.

 

You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.

Daisy Luther

About the Author

Daisy Luther

Please feel free to share any information from this site in part or in full, leaving all links intact, giving credit to the author and including a link to this website and the following bio. Daisy is a coffee-swigging, gun-toting, homeschooling blogger who writes about current events, preparedness, frugality, and the pursuit of liberty on her website, The Organic Prepper. Daisy is the publisher of The Cheapskate's Guide to the Galaxy, a monthly frugality newsletter, and she curates all the most important news links on her aggregate site, PreppersDailyNews.com. She is the best-selling author of 4 books and lives in the mountains of Virginia with her two daughters and an ever-growing menagerie. You can find Daisy on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter.

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