3 Compelling Reasons Preppers Should Buy a Patch of Land

(Psst: The FTC wants me to remind you that this website contains affiliate links. That means if you make a purchase from a link you click on, I might receive a small commission. This does not increase the price you'll pay for that item nor does it decrease the awesomeness of the item. ~ Daisy)

By J. G. Martinez D.

Hello there, fellows. I wanted to resume some thoughts that had been going around in my mind these last few days. Looking for some way to give myself a break and work in something that could benefit me enough for early retirement while I was still “young” and handsome, I decided to invest wisely, and I think it resulted more or less adequate.

A couple of land patches here and there, with a good eye, and the properties will have some real value in the near future. Even if I never see them flourish, my descendants will enjoy that his folk had some vision. Not too common in Venezuelans though.

Among the most evident advantages, I came out with the following as the most important.

You will have a place to live.

No matter what happens, if you plan it with some vision and work with your hands, over a good period of time, you will have a roof over your head in case tide goes against you. Your family will be protected. Summarizing, all the consequences of being homeless are avoided. This can be extremely important. It´s no big deal if this house is much smaller, or not as fancy, or it´s not even partially built or does not have the bathroom finishing you dream about. The idea is a secondary place where you can get into, located in a secure environment, stocked with supplies, preferably. In our particular situation, I was lucky enough to buy a small plot next to a place where my family already owned a small cottage. Therefore, the land extension was almost doubled. It´s a place where the rainy season is good, and in the dry season, is not as dry as some other places in the flatlands. The bad news is, our fruit tree garden is quite old and needs renovation, and our cabin needs new roofing. This means money, money that it´s hard to get being a migrant. We´re waiting to come back in a few months, but that´s something that will need planning, resources, and some special conditions.

The scenario we prepped for was not the one we got. It was FAR much worst. I believe I commented this already enough in previous articles. You just can´t prep for your worst nightmare. You won´t have time, and unless you are one of those Silicon Valley masterminds and/or have money to spare, it´s unlikely that you will make it. The best approach is to select wisely, and with your objectives clear. In your retreat or BOL you can store some clothes in good shape. You could save some non-perishable items and materials you could need in the future. You will have some extra space, but don´t waste it. It is going to be a LOT of work, but you will enjoy it. It doesn´t matter if it is a cabin by a lake, or in the middle in the mountains, or wherever you like. Just make sure it´s close to a water source, or provide it. I believe this talks by itself.

Please, take note of this, because it´s based on my experience. Don´t waste the most valuable resource you have: Time. Don´t overthink on it. Just go and find a place. Don´t rush, but don´t stop working on it. I can see now how lucky I was to have found this sort of organized communities. Most of the people I know never thought for prepping: they wanted financial independence solely. Had they collected the prepping gear and my approach, they would have lots of comforts that they don´t have now. Electricity, clean water, and other basic stuff. The economy went to hell, and now they´re praying for miracles to make the ends meet.

In my particular situation, we left mainly because of my ex´s family was already abroad. Not because I wanted to leave. Had we split with me being there and no kids in the middle, I would be in my homeland. I know, maybe I would be dead, with a shot in the head. Or maybe I would be living peacefully in my cottage listening to the wind in the trees, and waking up early to roam into the tropical forest, much healthier than I am now. We all know how hard is to have someone who depends entirely on us.  Providing them with someplace to go if things go bad, is invaluable.

You will have a potential business to run and an income source.

I had a small plan for early retirement: if things had been different and my project of goats, smoked cheese, poultry/eggs, and fish production (among some other independent industrial services providing within my specialty) our situation would have not been so hard now. I can say this, because some fellows could stay put in our homeland, because they already have a niche in the food production market, and are making a decent living (the rest of them are taking a beating, prematurely old and worn out –sorry guys, you know this is true, I see your FB pics).

You don’t have to learn to produce crops or struggle with poultry, pigs, goats, or some other hard work. If you’re in your senior years, renting some space for parking machinery (in Venezuela this was sort of common though) or even renting land to other farmers was also common. Growing pasture to sell, and managing it is a good way to make some income with minimum effort. With enough land and proper water management, a decent living can be achieved for someone in the golden age.

Your patrimony will see a significant increase in the long term.

And even if you don’t live enough to enjoy it your descendants will have it easier, should they need it sometime in the future. Just make sure to provide wise advice (as I am sure many senior preppers have done already) to preserve that legacy, and make it bigger.

For me, prepping is not just about getting a bunch of gear that maybe you will have to leave behind (don´t ask me how I learned this, please).

Prepping is also investing resources, like your time and money, in the wiser form possible. It’s about getting the needed skills to get the most out of your resources. It’s about developing enough abilities to identify a necessity, even if the economic environment is stormy and negative, and move forward to take advantage of it and provide something useful to your local community. It’s exactly what many of my people are doing to cope with the situation.

I have to mention (again) that I got into prepping looking for my financial independence, and some means to diversify my income in case an unexpected event could run over us, and keep covering the basic household expenses like food, power, and school.

Our currency went to the deepest abyss? Cool. We use foreign currency and screw the controls.

Are some dang speculators inflating the prices even in foreign currency? Great. Then we use cryptos. Small networks of suppliers charging in cryptos are all over the country. They’re not doing exactly great but can make a living.

There are other ways to use your land to earn income.

Want to have something to barter with? Make booze. A good quality one.

Need something that provides good cash fast and requires almost no initial investment? Grow lentils in that piece of land you invested in.

Want to make real money even in the deep s….t Venezuela is? Find a way to make beer with the lentils you could not sell on time and got spoiled.

It may sound funny, but what I have found is, that a guy I know since we were children, is producing liquor with grapefruits. And he is selling it! He does a lot of other stuff like electricity work and plumbing, for example, but he is able to make a living. He did not have to migrate. Guys like him have a very developed street smartness. In a small community, they don’t screw anyone, because abusing someone’s trust would mean that the network automatically “ban” that person, and the trading then would be severely affected. No one wants that. Most of his customers watched us growing up, and they would go with our moms if we do something wrong. Jeez, gives me the chills just to think my mom complaining at me…even I’m over 40 and with kids.

This reasons to invest in some good land are proven.

They could have worked for me to live peacefully, enjoying a simpler life, if some circumstances of it would have resulted differently. Relationships can be difficult, and common goals are not always shared in the deepest of the soul. The stress of living a situation of general scarcity is very likely to push your relationships to the limit. You will know who your partner is once difficult choices have to be made. Things like “I told you so” and similar phrases don’t help. Be aware. Moving to our cottage and using some resources to make it productive could have been a smarter move, but things didn’t happen that way because of family issues. Now I’m stuck abroad, struggling day after day without any indication of when I will be able to come back.

But I accept all the challenges God wants to throw on my back. I have a treasure in my friends, kids, and family, and I am rich enough with a roof over my head and food in my kids’ table.

So, thank you, Lord.

And thanks to you, my dear fellows, for reading these lines I put together thinking on those who will find them useful.

Be safe!

What do you think?

Have you purchased land to use to bug out if and when it is necessary? If not, is it something you’d like to do? Please share your thoughts in the comments.

About Jose

Jose is an upper middle class professional. He is a former worker of the oil state company with a Bachelor’s degree from one of the best national Universities. He has a small 4 members family, plus two cats and a dog. An old but in good shape SUV, a good 150 square meters house in a nice neighborhood, in a small but (formerly) prosperous city with two middle size malls. Jose is a prepper and shares his eyewitness accounts and survival stories from the collapse of his beloved Venezuela. Thanks to your help Jose has gotten his family out of Venezuela. They are currently setting up a new life in another country. Follow Jose on YouTube and gain access to his exclusive content on Patreon. Donations: paypal.me/JoseM151

There are many advantages to owning land. Here are the three Jose believes are the most important.
J.G. Martinez D

About the Author

J.G. Martinez D

About Jose Jose is an upper middle class professional. He is a former worker of the oil state company with a Bachelor’s degree from one of the best national Universities. He has a small 4 members family, plus two cats and a dog. An old but in good shape SUV, a good 150 square meters house in a nice neighborhood, in a small but (formerly) prosperous city with two middle size malls. Jose is a prepper and shares his eyewitness accounts and survival stories from the collapse of his beloved Venezuela. Thanks to your help Jose has gotten his family out of Venezuela. They are currently setting up a new life in another country. Follow Jose on YouTube and gain access to his exclusive content on Patreon. Donations: paypal.me/JoseM151

Leave a Comment:

You Need More Than Food to Survive
50-nonfood-stockpile-necessities

In the event of a long-term disaster, there are non-food essentials that can be vital to your survival and well-being. Make certain you have these 50 non-food stockpile essentials. Sign up for your FREE report and get prepared.

We respect your privacy.
Malcare WordPress Security